Tuesday, June 28, 2011

Singles Club: Common Prayer

I've been remiss, my loves. It's been quite a little while since I talked about the very dear darlings of Common Prayer, so I do believe it's about time right this minute to rectify this situation. Y'all will remember that Common Prayer was among my list of the very best records of all of 2010, and happily these purveyors of dreamy delicious confectionary sonic goodies are working on album number the second. I can't wait.

But in the meantime, they've released an impossibly adorable cover of the Talking Heads song "Love Is A Building on Fire." Replete with all the elements that made Common Prayer's debut so special, their cover treatment unleashes glorious prettiness (not to mention a whole bunch of pretty tweeting) and charming oddballishness all over the dang place. It's a little ray of sunshine bursting through the heavy clouds of a summer storm. A hearty well done indeed to Mr. Jason Russo, Ms. Alexandra Marvar, and their delightful co-conspirators.

Do your ears a favor and listen to this song this instant.

mp3: Love Is A Building On Fire (Common Prayer from the O+ Festival Compilation of 2010 Artists)

Live Review: Pepper Rabbit @ Rock'n'Roll Hotel, 6/14/2011

So there I was on birthday eve, preparing to spend a night in and rest up for the revels later in the week. But thanks to the gentle arm-twisting of a friend (thanks, DP), I ended up at the Rock'n'Roll Hotel, taking in one heck of a good show. Which, as you can imagine, was an infinitely better way to ring in another year than just watching boring old reruns in one's pajamas.

Pepper Rabbit, on tour with the adorably lively Louisiana firecrackers Givers, wasted no time in making quite an impression on me. I was instantly charmed, taken in wholeheartedly by their super cute pop hooks and delirious jangle. Combining elements of bands like The Morning Benders (sunshiney retro pop), Longwave (earnest rambunctiousness), Generationals (dizzy dandiness) and Hooray for Earth (crucial keys at crucial times), Pepper Rabbit bounded along from song to song, emitting affability and impossible catchiness at every note.

The LA boys impressed for the duration of their set. The mournful pastoral "Older Brother" was tender and sweetly cooed, while "Red Wine" was artfully done, slinking along in placid perfection. Their bouncy, chirpy vibe was hard to resist. They showed a cheeky streak, too, even pretending to be Givers at one point in their set, impish grins breaking out across the stage giving away their ruse. Darling! Oh, behave, sirs.

I can't tell y'all just how happy I am to have caved to some peer pressure and gone to the show. Pepper Rabbit alone was well worth leaving the old homestead for, and I can't encourage you enough in your endeavors to seek them out and make them a part of your record collection, not to mention seeing them live. I was pleasantly surprised and then some.

mp3: Rose Mary Stretch (Pepper Rabbit from the forthcoming Red Velvet Snow Ball)

[photo by Noah Jashinski]

The Good Ship Rediscovery: Black Eyes - Black Eyes

We all forget about the older stuff from time to time, in our never-ending quest to stay up to speed with the latest and greatest. But one should always respect their elders. So don’t forget about them, y’hear?

By now you’ve heard me bemoan my lack of interest in the DC scene years back plenty. But there were a few scant exceptions to my local negligence. During the height of all that “electroclash” kerfuffle in the early Naughties, there was one DC band that made the hairs on the back of my neck stand up and that really had me standing at attention. When they didn’t have me dancing, that is. The band that really broke through my Brits only rule was Black Eyes, a band I miss to this very day.


What Black Eyes did was make some very loud, very maniacal, and very hard to ignore music. On their self-titled record, released by Dischord in 2003, the fivesome unleashed a potent, furious maelstrom of angsty urban noise, replete with abrasively shouted vocals snarling from places of ennui and vexation, guitars that crush under the weight of their varying degrees of angularity and distortion, and a rhythm section that moved to the beat of demonic forces. In addition to the marvelous messiness, too, was an underlying danceability. A band you could, theoretically, dance and rage to at the same time, if you were so inclined.


Essentially rooted in that hallowed hardcore sound DC has come to be known for, Black Eyes expanded upon that attitude and twisted it into ten distinct, really special hybrid songs. Each song feels remarkably layered, and a little dark, from the breakneck brattiness of my forever favorite “Deformative,” a blur of taut drums and euphoric energy, to the sinister bassline and wail of contorting guitar riffs of “Someone Has His Fingers Broken,” or the hysterical growl of “A Pack of Wolves,” venomously played and full of beautiful chaos.


All told, Black Eyes is a great record, and Black Eyes was a great band. If you never had the pleasure of seeing them live when they were together, you can at the very least sink your teeth into Black Eyes and enjoy the sonic sensations when it sinks its teeth right back into you.


m4a: Deformative (Black Eyes from Black Eyes)

Sunday, June 26, 2011

Singles Club: Shimmering Stars

When I was little, we used to sometimes venture out to Chicago to visit one set of my grandparents. Sitting in their old apartment, I was surrounded by the must of age and pools of sunlight, dust sparkling in the afternoon Chicago sun and memories floating every which way. Vancouver's Shimmering Stars makes me feel that sensation, that sort of wistful nostalgia, both for things I've known and things I couldn't possibly have experienced.

The band got their start after Rory McClure crossed paths with some old Everly Brothers stuff. And not for nothing,
Shimmering Stars evokes that glorious era of the late 50s and early 60s, when it was cool to wear your heart on your sleeve if you were a dude and cool to make pretty pop songs with a wonderful wall of sound. I don't know about y'all, but I'm looking forward to hearing a whole lot more from these Canadians.

mp3:
I'm Gonna Try (Shimmering Stars from the forthcoming Violent Hearts)


Video Vixens: Is Tropical

There's something not quite right about the Is Tropical video for "The Greeks." I'm gonna go out on a limb and suggest that perhaps it's the sweet little kiddos enacting various fucked up scenarios, like a drug deal gone bad and bloody, or blowing up a suburban abode.

But you know what? Perhaps it's just my cultural desensitization talking, but there's something a little funny about the whole thing. Perhaps it's because there's an adorable kid running around trying not to laugh the whole time that kinda takes the edge off the video. Or the notion that, according to the band, it's about "everything, and kinda nothing, and being young, or something," according to Is Tropical. As for the song, it's a darkly dizzying dancefloor-ready romp, sounding a little on the vintage side. Not bad indeed.

mp3: The Greeks (Is Tropical from Native To)

mp3: The Greeks (Moonlight Matters Remix) (Is Tropical from Native To)




IS TROPICAL - THE GREEKS (official music video) from EL NINO on Vimeo.

Friday, June 24, 2011

On The Road Again: The Chapin Sisters

Sure, as a music blogger I go to a whole lot of shows. I usually know what to expect from these shows, but it's possible, once in a blue moon, to unexpectedly wow me. Just ask The Chapin Sisters. Seeing them open for (and then join in with) She & Him last year was one heck of a good time. I was completely enthralled by their gorgeous voices, and their song style that falls somewhere between countrified, corn-fed Appalachian traditionalism and the beautiful bohemian bonhomie of vintage 60s era Laurel Canyon.

With their flowing locks, flowing dresses, and excellent songs flowing from their lips, The Chapin Sisters are not to be missed.

06/27 Los Angeles, CA @ Bootleg Theater w/Henry Wolfe & Harper Simon
07/15 New York, NY @ Rockwood Music Hall w/very special guest Sean Rowe
07/16 Huntington, LI @ Heckscher Park w/The Chapin Family
07/17 Philadelphia, PA @ World Café w/very special guest Sean Rowe
07/18 Arlington, VA @ Jammin’ Java w/very special guest Sean Rowe
07/19 Piermont, NY @ The Turning Point w/very special guest Andy Friedman
07/20 Boston, MA @ Café 939 co-bill w/Rebecca Loebe w/special guest
Lauren Flatery
07/23 Hoboken, NJ @ Maxwell’s w/very special guest Sean Rowe
07/24 Collinsville, CT @ Bridge Street w/very special guest Sean Rowe
07/26 River Falls, WI @ Wall Ampitheater, Univ of WI River Fest

mp3: Palm Tree (The Chapin Sisters from Two) (via Muzzle of Bees!)

[photo by Sita Marlier]

Singles Club: That Ghost

I don't know about y'all, but the paragon of the one man "bedroom" wayfarers will forever be Badly Drawn Boy. But following in his lo-fi footsteps is Ryan Thomas Schmale, or That Ghost.

In this pair of prettiness, Schmale shows himself willing and able to envelop his listener in a hypnotic wave of summery slow motion. The songs are cooler than the other side of the pillow, pretty as a picture, and each has a little bit of a subtle shimmy as well as a sort of isolation behind all that liquid languid languor. He's perhaps a bit more Ernest Greene than Damon Gough, but either way, I'm liking what I hear from
That Ghost. You just might dig it, too.

mp3:
To Like You (That Ghost from Songs Out Here)

mp3:
Calls (That Ghost from Songs Out Here)

Thursday, June 23, 2011

Live Review: The Dirty Lungs @ Comet Ping Pong, 6/10/2011

Some of you know it was my birthday last week. Evidently, the concert-going world was aware of this, and arranged for a whole lot of quality shit to be going down to coincide with my getting another year older (though none the wiser, my friends). The kickoff, if you will, to the copious amounts of awesome music that rolled through town just in time for my bonne annee, was Fuzzy Logic favorites The Dirty Lungs, who brought their scuzzed up, swampy goodness to Comet and made a daggum believer out of me all over again.

"We're
The Dirty Lungs from Birmingham, Alabama," the band proclaimed, preparing to unleash the good times on Comet. They started out with the aggressive wail of "Serial Suicide," one of their newer offerings. Dirty, snarky, a touch snarling, and all sorts of loud, upon hearing that song I was damned confident the entire set would be rad. And it was. The Dirty Lungs has quite a kick to their sound, and I kept envisioning a beautifully messy unification of Dead Meadow, first EP Kings of Leon, The Black Lips, and CCR as they played. I would hope that notion appeals to you, because I tell you what, in practice it's a damn fine sound.

These dudes turned their stuff up extra loud, which pleased me to no end. I had been listening to the new Liturgy record on my way to the show, and though slightly deafened from that, even with earplugs these
Lungs rattled my eardrums something fierce. Every song was a firecracker, even the slower jams. "Don't Fucking Remind Me" was a gem, steamed up hazy as a summer night in Tuscaloosa and an absolute filthy delight. They were a perfect band to see on such a sweltering Friday evening. There's so very much to like about The Dirty Lungs, y'all, so make sure to show them some love when they roll up on your town.

mp3:
D. D. Reg Reg (The Dirty Lungs from Deregulate Your Heart)


Tuesday, June 21, 2011

The Untitled Interview #135: Starring Eddie Argos (Art Brut)

It’s been many a year since I first heard the now-familiar, angstily angular proclamations from the wonderfully whinging (and covertly poppy!) Art Brut. Having successfully formed a band, had weekends both good and bad, and recently released their fourth record, mouthpiece Eddie Argos has finally broken into song.

Argos historically has left nothing out with his songwriting, covering grammar school crushes and drunken equipment failure with a grinning, charming candor. I had the pleasure of catching up with Eddie on the eve of the band’s most recent US tour (to say I was excited about their show here Wednesday night might be a slight understatement), and not even our dodgy connection and my phone’s less-than-suitableness as as interview device could hide that charm of Mister Eddie Argos. Read on for his take on all things
Art Brut, tea, and the Bay City Rollers, and don’t dare miss their show at the Black Cat Wednesday evening.

Fuzzy Logic: How the hell are you?
Eddie Argos: Good, good, we just landed in New York about an hour and a half ago. I’m just acquainting myself to the new timezone.

FL: What was the last song you listened to?
EA: The last song I listened to was...I’ve been on the plane, I fell asleep actually, and the Telegraph single’s collection was playing, and I pressed repeat meaning to repeat the entire album, but I think I just might have repeated one song accidentally, I might have listened to it about a hundred times on repeat. I feel asleep for like three hours, which is quite a long time on a flight.

FL: Playing music is:
EA: Awesome fun. I can’t understand why anybody’s not in a band…I’m quite excited really when I get onstage. I’d go mental if I didn’t have a band to be in, I think I’d keep all my things pent up inside and go mad, so yeah, playing music is awesome. I think everyone should do it. I’m surprised that people that don’t play in bands don’t go mad.


FL: What album most made you realize you wanted to make music?
EA: Probably a Jonathan Richman record, I think, because he’s got quite a funny voice. I think I heard him singing on something, I don’t know what, I can’t remember now, I’ve got so many Jonathan Richman records I’ve lost track, but I think I heard him and I was like, “Cool, I can do that.” Either him or Half Japanese, I think, one of those two.

FL: Beatles or Stones?
EA: I have to pick the Stones. [After informing Eddie that some people pick an outside answer] You can’t say neither, you have to have a proper answer.

FL: Top 5 albums (of now, of this month, or of ever):
EA: Well right now…I probably don’t even like 5 albums right now…let’s say ever. My favorite albums ever are…this isn’t in any sort of order. The Yummy Fur – Sex Works. Sort of drunk rock music. The Oliver Twist Manifesto by Luke Haines, he was the singer in The Auteurs. That’s kinda cool. I also like any Jonathan Richman album, I would say. Half Japanese, one of the Japanese imports. I’m really bad at choosing…

FL: Favorite music-related movie?
EA: Airheads. I probably saw it when I was about 16, and I think it might be why I’m in a band. I own Airheads on DVD, that’s how much I like that film. I don’t think anyone owns in on DVD. Check it out. It’s a good film, very funny.

FL: What’s the first thing you think when you wake up in the morning?
EA: I probably think about tea. I like to have a cup of tea really before my mind works. So I think about where I am and how I’m going to get some tea. In America when you ask for tea, they don’t give you milk and they put lemon in it. I’m always pretty much thinking about tea, especially when I wake up first thing in the morning, it’s probably one of my first thoughts. Where can I get some tea from?

FL: Little-known Art Brut fact?
EA: Um…we’re all so honest…one second, I’ll ask. [referring to Ian: “Ian, what’s a little-known Art Brut fact?”]. Just finding out. Nope. He doesn’t know anything. Ian’s the youngest in Art Brut. Can I say that? Maybe that’s another fact. Jasper’s new. People tend to forget. We see posters with our old guitarist, and I feel bad for Jasper. Though he has been in the band for about seven years now.

FL: The greatest record store in the world is:
EA: Wow. I like Amoeba a lot, in Los Angeles, but I know that’s quite a clichéd answer isn’t it? I have like a weird stigma, I walk into record shops and completely forget what music I like. I get so overwhelmed with the selection that my mind sort of goes blank. Then I remember that I like Half Japanese, because they’ve got quite a lot of records. That’s why I’ve got so many Half Japanese records, because they’re the only band I can remember. No, it’s just overwhelming because there’s so much choice. You end up leaving and you get home and realize there was something else you should have got.

FL: Best piece of advice you’ve ever been given?
EA: I don’t really listen to advice. Someone should advise me to listen to advice perhaps. None of it sunk in. Or I chose not to listen to it.

FL: If you were so inclined, whom would you form a tribute band in honor of?
EA: My friend Tom had this really good name for a band, and I kind of want to use it. You know the band the Bay City Rollers? He wanted to form a tribute band called Basically Rollers, which I quite like. So I think I’d like to be in Basically Rollers just to use the name, really. “S-a-t-u-r-d-a-y night.” I just think Basically Rollers is a really good tribute band name. I would be in the Basically Rollers.

FL: Friend-submitted question. Please discuss your dance moves, and whether or not you have moves for any of them.
EA: My band told me, and my girlfriend told me, you know those great big things they have at like second-hand car dealerships, they’re full of air and their arms wave at you? Apparently that’s how I dance. I don’t have a name for it, but whatever those things are called, that’s probably where I got all of my moves.

FL: Best song ever written?
EA: Best song ever written? “Roadrunner” maybe? By Jonathan Richman I think? I do love that song. “Roadrunner, roadrunner.” That or maybe “Dirty Water” by The Standelles. Or…I dunno…The Kinks. I dunno. I think probably “Roadrunner.” I had a big debate with my girlfriend, I can either have Ghostbusters the film or “Roadrunner.” I could only get to hear one or see one ever again. I chose “Roadrunner” over Ghostbusters. So “Roadrunner” must be the best song in the world for me to do that.

mp3:
Lost Weekend (Art Brut from Brilliant! Tragic!)



Saturday, June 18, 2011

Newsflash!: New (Old) Young Sinclairs!

Well shitfire, y'all! Anytime I hear news about The Young Sinclairs I know it's gonna be a good daggum day. My favorite far out Roanoke gentlemen have hitherly just released a record full of unreleased (or stuff that was only released on cassette) goodies to fill your ears and minds with beauty and wonder. These lads do pastoral psych like nobody else, and if you have yet to give them a listen, now's the perfect opportunity. You can get Don't Believe In Demos Vol. 1 from all over the internets, and you can also stream it to your heart's content.

Expect a full gushing over this here album soon. Y'all know I just can't help myself.





LP Lust: Stormy Richmond Edition

It's been a little while since I went on an honest-to-goodness, bona fide record-buying spree. Oh sure, I've been itching to get out there and bring home some new (or not so new) vinyl to add to my collection, but I just haven't done it. When I went down to Richmond last weekend, I was more concerned with spending time with some folks than I was buying LPs. But sometimes, my little chickadees, the best sprees just so happen to be unplanned. Such was the case as I ventured out to visit some of my favorite thrifting haunts around Richmond. One location proved to be, well, overflowing with quality stuff. The best part is, all of what you'll see on my list below was procured for under $20. Total. Damn right, y'all. Damn right.

Here's the goods on what came home with me after a great, albeit stormy, weekend down in the River City. Makes me think of pool plans gone awry (but in an ok kinda way), brunch, and berries and weeding in Church Hill. Ah, memories.



*Aerosmith - Draw The Line

* Wham! - Make It Big

* The Who - Who's Next

* Rod Stewart - Rod Stewart and The Faces

* Bruce Springsteen - Nebraska

* AC/DC - Highway to Hell

* Aerosmith - Aerosmith

* Quiet Riot - Mental Health

* Johnny Best, Dick Cathcart, and Their All-Stars - Dixieland

* The Doobie Brothers - Best Of The Doobies

* Derek Lamb - She Was Poor But She Was Honest: Nice, Naughty and Nourishing Songs of The London Music Hall and Pubs

* Cat Stevens - Tea for The Tillerman

* Blondie - Parallel Lines

* Sonny & Cher - Look At Us

* The Jackson 5 - Diana Ross Presents The Jackson 5

* Peter Gabriel - So

* The Cars - Heartbeat City

* Bruce Springsteen - Born To Run

* Diana Ross & The Supremes with The Temptations - TCB Soundtrack

* Sri Aurobindo - Cave Painting (procured at Bad Behaviour #2)

Friday, June 17, 2011

Get Yer Pedals Out #6: Starring Sam McCormally (Ugly Purple Sweater)

I couldn't quite tell you why, but for the longest time I've been somewhat moderately obsessed with pedals. Since I'm no guitarist I don't really have a valid reason for this, other than the fact that they both make pretty noises and are rather nice to look at. Much, really, like the folks who use them. I've decided to turn my inexplicable pedal fancy into Fuzzy Logic fodder, and I do hope you'll enjoy my foray into the ins and outs of pedal worship.


Ugly Purple Sweater, when I think of it initially, conjures up retina-burning images of putrid purple argyle monstrosities. Yet the name also conjures up rather pretty, sweetly strummed, nigh on twangy urban folk, pleasing to the eye and ear, straight outta the WDC. I recently met up with singer/acoustic wiz Sam McCormally at a bar formerly known as The Left Bank in Adams Morgan, where we talked pedals over beer and really, really bad club music. Ugly Purple Sweater just so happens to be playing over at the Rock & Roll Hotel this very evening, and having recently seen them band live I suggest you consider adding their set to your weekend plans.

Fuzzy Logic: Which pedal is your very favorite and why?

Sam McCormally: My very favorite pedal…I used to play with the distortion pedal called the Big Muff. It was a specific Big Muff, the Big Muff Pi, which I have heard, although I cannot confirm, is made from old Soviet tank parts. Which can’t be true, really, come to think of it, but this is what I was told. But it’s a distortion pedal, makes things sound pretty gnarly. I like that pedal a lot. It sounds like something mysterious is happening on the inside, it sounds like an organic sort of product, rather than something very sort of doctored.


FL: Favorite chord?

SM: I play a lot of, and probably too many, full diminished seventh chords.


FL: Who’s your guitarist icon?

SM: Well, past Deerhoof guitarist Chris Cooper, who played with the band from Apple 'O through Runners Four is probably my favorite guitarist, there’s a period of time where his guitar work is my favorite guitar work. He doesn’t have a huge rig, but he gets really great tone. Along with John Dieterich, whose been playing with Deerhoof since before that. I hold a special affection for the records that they're both on. They play a lot of unison parts with things just slightly, and intentionally, I think, out of tune, which produces a sonic effect similar to that of a swarm of bees. I love it.


FL: With all the pedals out there, how do you decide which ones to procure?

SM: Well it’s interesting, because right now I primarily play acoustic guitar in this band, which raises the question of how do you amplify an acoustic guitar in the context of a live rock band? Which is complicated. You can mic it, but then if you’re playing with a rock band it’s difficult to rig it so that you don’t have a lot of feedback. You can plug it in, but then if you have the kind of pickup that I have, it doesn’t sound very good. The pedal that I rely on most right now is a pedal that helps you overcome this problem, which is how do you make an acoustic guitar sound like an acoustic guitar? And the thing I have is called a Fishman Aura pedal, it’s a digital pedal that superimposes the sound of an acoustic guitar onto the signal coming out of your acoustic electric guitar. It’s what I’ve settled on as sort of the best of the bad options that are presented to me as someone who’s trying to play an acoustic guitar through a PA system. A lot of people don’t like them because they think they’re sort of artificial, they say, “Well, that’s not the sound of YOUR guitar, that’s the sound of this other guitar that the Fishman people have imaged that they’re then projecting onto your guitar,” but then that raises a lot of questions like what is amplification in general? Are you ever getting the sound of your instrument? So for me it was the best out of a series of poor options that led me to this particular pedal.


FL: What’s your dream pedal?

SM: I really like the Memory Man delay pedals, but they’re slightly outside my price range at the moment. I think they’re like $250 or something, which I could probably throw down for, but in the context of all the other gear…if every $250 piece of equipment I wanted I were to buy, I’d be bankrupt. So I have to hold on.


[photo by Rishi Chakrabarty]

Thursday, June 16, 2011

Reminder: The Return of Bad Behaviour with The Diamond Center, Creepoid, and Sri Aurobindo

Y'ALL. This show to end all shows is TONIGHT. Do not miss out on this or you'll be so very sad. If you haven't heard, here's the scoop:


Baltimore's Sri Aurobindo (heavy, weighty psych), Philly's Creepoid (gritty, grungy psych), and Richmond's The Diamond Center (ethereal, twangy psych) will all be together under one roof making all sorts of beautiful sounds for us to listen to. Plus, since the show is the day after my birthday, there will probably be some cupcakes. Make that definitely, as far as cupcakes are concerned. And a super definitely as far as being a ridiculously awesome show is concerned. I'm so excited, and I pretty much can't hide it. Come get silly with us.

Tuesday, June 14, 2011

Happy Flag Day

So today, my little loves, just so happens to be Flag Day. I usually don't think much of Flag Day, other than it being the day before my birthday, but this year I feel a bit differently. Y'all bear with me while I jump on the soapbox for a minute here. I might not reside within DC proper, but I sure do spend quite a bit of time there. And have done, ever since I was a knee high to a grasshopper. I won't go all totally political wacky on you, but I do think it's inherently wrong that the District does not have the same voting rights given to citizens in the 50 states. DC folks have to pay taxes, so they should get the voting rights, too. After all, one of the tenets of the founding of this country was about that whole taxation without representation thing, no? And certain other states (Utah, I'm talking to you) should not be allowed to get more representation just so DC can get their fair share. Enough with the red tape and excuses, politicos. Just make it happen.

If you're so inclined, head over to Dupont Circle later to celebrate DC Flag Tattoo Day and rally in favor of voting rights. Get the scoop
here.

Saturday, June 11, 2011

The Untitled Interview #134: Starring Alessi Laurent-Marke (Alessi's Ark)

I think we can all agree that most 17 year-olds do not get signed to fairly large imprints of major labels. Alessi Laurent-Marke (aka Alessi's Ark) was no ordinary 17 year-old. These days, she’s no ordinary 20 year-old, possessed of a glorious voice that could sweetly melt glaciers (way faster than global warming) and a folksy style that is both down home and otherworldly at once. But it’s always about that voice of hers, friends, and you really have to hear it to believe it.

Alessi is bringing her charming wiles all the way from London to make some US appearances, tonight she’ll be taking the stage at Bella and Monday an instore at Richmond’s Steady Sounds awaits. I believe the words “not to be missed” apply here, so make sure you don’t.


Fuzzy Logic: How the hell are you?

Alessi Laurent-Marke: Hello there! I'm well thanks - full of a good dinner.


FL: What was the last song you listened to?

AL-M: “Never Going Back Again,” Fleetwood Mac.


FL: What album most made you realize you wanted to make music?

AL-M: There were quite a few. Two albums that really stood out though and
still do are ; Songs for Beginners by Graham Nash and The Execution of All Things by Rilo Kiley.

FL: Beatles or Stones?

AL-M: Hmmm. Beatles. George.


FL: Top 5 albums (of now, of this month, or of ever):

AL-M: Top 5 of the week :

- You May Already Be Dreaming, Neva Dinova.
- It's So Hard To Know Who is Going To Love You, Karen Dalton.

- More Adventurous, Rilo Kiley.
- Swim, Whispertown2000.

- Age of Adz, Sufjan Stevens.

FL: What's the first thing you think when you wake up in the morning?

AL-M: 'Coffee!'


FL: The greatest record store in the world is:

AL-M: Park Ave. CDs in Winter Park, Florida.


FL: Best piece of advice you've ever been given?

AL-M: Do few things and do them well.


FL: If you weren't in a band you'd be:
AL-M: Training to be a masseuse.


FL: In school you had to play an instrument. What prompted you to pick the
drums?
AL-M: They looked like great fun to play.

Friday, June 10, 2011

Album Review: Pete and the Pirates – One Thousand Pictures

Somehow, it's been about three years since I last foamed at the mouth about an LP by Reading's Pete and The Pirates. When last we met, the five scamps I had no choice but to refer to as "impish" were filling stereo speakers the world over with their slyly naughty, come-hither jangle on Little Death. Now, on One Thousand Pictures, instead of an album full of innuendo that runs rampant (and was marginally less obvious than a 2 am knock on the door wearing one's birthday suit), the band exhibits a definite maturation, both lyrically and musically speaking. Mind you, they're still adorable, and I'm pretty sure they're still up for it.

The change struck me immediately, in the stately sweep of intro track "Can't Fish." The band sounds, dare I even think it, almost serious. It almost sounds as though, in this song and many others, that Pete and The Pirates is beginning to dip their collective toe into the fine British tradition of social commentary in song. They don't ever get as scathing as FL favorite The Young Knives, for example, but the foray into observation suits them well. The LP, while distinctly more grown up than Little Death, still retains the overall flavor of what made that record so indispensible. "Little Gun" shimmies rambunctiously til kingdom come, reminding me just a touch of golden era Supergrass. It's one of my favorites, as is "Come To The Bar," full of cheek and impossible to resist. And as a side note, if I ever call any of you darlings "my crocodile," it comes from this song.

There's a pair of songs on One Thousand Pictures that was available well before the LP was released, "Winter 1" and "Blood Gets Thin." The former charmingly chugs along on a steady march, and the latter laced with sinister guitars and an ominous yet playful air. "United" is another favorite, and hearkens back to the Little Death days of tantalizingly sexed-up songs. I'm more than a little in love with album closer "Half Moon Street," a lovely, wistful ballad in the vein of Little Death's "Eyes Like Tar," all slow burning interspersed with that guitar racket I love so much. It's a great way to end, that's for sure.

It was a long time coming, but I'm glad Pete and The Pirates took their time with this one. One Thousand Pictures is a delight, and I'm fairly certain I'll be talking about it with the other top records of the year when the time comes.

mp3: Come To The Bar (Pete and The Pirates from One Thousand Pictures)

Otherwise Engaged: Those Darlins

It is an unfortunate reality for the serious concertgoer that on occasion, there will be more than one show on any given night that you really, really, REALLY wanna go to. Since the vast majority of us don't own a time machine, nor have the ability to either clone ourselves or split ourselves in half (or thirds or quarters, depending on the night in question), this tends to present a problem. Difficult decisions are made based on a multitude of variables (perhaps some of you even make lists of pros and cons), and ultimately, a show is chosen. But those other shows are still gonna be killer, and I'd like to give a little face time to the shows that, while I can't go myself, are highly recommended all the same.

So tonight is one of those nights where one is inclined to make pouty faces and whine about how it's not fair that there's SO MUCH good shit going on in DC and environs and that making tough decisions is hard. For instance, on any other night, I'd be totally all about going to see badass chickadees (and token maleage) Those Darlins. I mean, having seen them live already I know what a great show they put on, but I just can't see them tonight at Jammin Java because I've been promised elsewhere. DANGIT. So for those who are indecisive, and dig sassypants ladies and their whiskey-laced antics, I recommend to you Those Darlins. They're touring their new LP, and I'm pretty sure it's gonna be dynamite. The show and the record, to clarify.

mp3: Screws Get Loose (Those Darlins from Screws Get Loose)

Newsflash!: The Return of Bad Behaviour with The Diamond Center, Creepoid, and Sri Aurobindo

Darlings! I can't even begin to tell you how very fucking excited I am to have three such wonderful, talented, amazing, and just plain awesome bands coming to DC to play the second installment of my monthly Bad Behaviour residency over at Bella. And if you're into psyche, psyche, or psychedelia, odds are these bands will be familiar to you and you'll be pretty dang excited yourself.

Baltimore's Sri Aurobindo (heavy, weighty psych), Philly's Creepoid (gritty, grungy psych), and Richmond's The Diamond Center (ethereal, twangy psych) will all be together under one roof making all sorts of beautiful sounds for us to listen to. Plus, since the show is the day after my birthday, there will probably be some cupcakes.

So let's recap, shall we? Three great bands. And cupcakes. I really don't see any reason not to be at Bella next Thursday.

mp3: WTT (The Diamond Center from My Only Companion)

mp3: Hollowed Doubt (Creepoid from Horse Heaven)


Sri Aurobindo - No Coincidence by friendsrecords


[Poster by Rich Bernett; Printed by BaseCamp DC]

Wednesday, June 8, 2011

Singles Club: 1,2,3

It's hot and I'm tired, y'all. Since I'm not being surrounded by a harem of strapping shirtless dudes fanning me with enormous feathery fans, feeding me grapes, holding my champagne glass and otherwise just looking decorative, I guess now's a good time to recommend a hot damn mighty fine summertime slowdown jam from 1,2,3.

1,2,3 is a pair of sassy Pittsburgh boys paying all kinds of homage to 60s and 70s soul and injecting that vibe with their own attitude and a smidge of knob-twiddling. "Riding Coach" croons and shimmies and flirts its way into your good graces, and I'm pretty sure once it gets there it'll stay there for quite a good long while. It's blue-eyed sassafrass soul, and it sounds so very good on sultry days like today.

mp3:
Riding Coach (1,2,3 from the forthcoming New Heaven)


Blog Love: When The Sun Hits' Free Compilation of Awesome

Confession. Apart from a few chosen blog friends, I really don't read other music blogs. Who has the time? But my friend Dave recently pointed me in the direction of shoegaze/noisepop blog When The Sun Hits, and more specifically, the killer (and free!) compilation those folks just released.

Said compilation features songs, some unreleased, by a whole bunch of great bands, including but not limited to locals Screen Vinyl Image and Mittenfields, as well as The Electric Mainline, Love Culture, and The Sleepover Disaster to name but a few. I definitely recommend y'all go and get you this here compendium of scuzzy fuzzy goodness, and perhaps add
WTSH to your favorite music blogs. They do one heck of a job over there. Below, for your listening pleasure, is some ridiculous tomfuzzery courtesy Mittenfields. Dig it.

mp3:
Mixed Signals (Mittenfields from the When The Sun Hits compilation)


Our Daily Vinyl #8: The Monkees

It is a sad but true fact of life that I once derisively mocked anyone who opined how amazing vinyl was and how music just sounded better when played on a turntable. Now, in a somewhat ironic twist of fate, I’ve come to realize, well, it’s true.

I don't know about you, kiddos, but when I think of The Monkees I think of the too-cute-for-words TV series about the madcap mishaps of those wacky yet loveable bandmates. If
The Diamond Center's Kyle Harris has his way, though, we'll all be singing a different tune. Oh, and speaking of The Diamond Center, you can catch the hottest things in Richmond here in DC next Thursday, as part of the Bad Behaviour residency series over at Bella along with Creepoid and Sri Aurobindo. You don't want to miss any of them, believe you me. And now, Kyle's Monkees musings:

"The Monkees - Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn, and Jones, LTD. - A good friend turned me on to this one when I was definitely not interested in the Monkees. I quickly changed my tune."

mp3:
Caraway (The Diamond Center from the Caraway/20 Twin 7")





[Logo by the fantastic Bill Taylor; Photo of Kyle Harris by Megan Petty]





Otherwise Engaged: Love Inks

It is an unfortunate reality for the serious concertgoer that on occasion, there will be more than one show on any given night that you really, really, REALLY wanna go to. Since the vast majority of us don't own a time machine, nor have the ability to either clone ourselves or split ourselves in half (or thirds or quarters, depending on the night in question), this tends to present a problem. Difficult decisions are made based on a multitude of variables (perhaps some of you even make lists of pros and cons), and ultimately, a show is chosen. But those other shows are still gonna be killer, and I'd like to give a little face time to the shows that, while I can't go myself, are highly recommended all the same.

Now that it's nice (well, ok, sweltering is not really nice, but work with me here) out, things start really happening in this fair city. I can't tell you the number of times I've gotten excited about a show, only to find that I'm already going to another show I'm also excited about. If only I could time travel...but I digress. Love Inks is in town tonight, touring their fine selves around and representing Austin good and proper. Head out to the Red Palace tonight to see the band dubbed "stripped down desert-pop" by NME (and they also nabbed #14 on NME's list of Best New Bands).

mp3: Blackeye (Love Inks from Blackeye)



Tuesday, June 7, 2011

Album Review: The Pains of Being Pure at Heart – Belong

When The Pains of Being Pure at Heart released their self-titled LP a couple years back, I was pretty dang confident that they couldn’t possibly get any cuter, or any more adorable, or any more ridiculously infectious than they were on that fantastic collection of sweet fuzzpop songs. Now, having listened to new record Belong many a time, I have to say I stand corrected. With Belong, TPOBPAH shakes off that sophomore stigma and delivers a truly beautiful, intoxicating record.

For quite some time it took me a while to move beyond the first three songs, so splendid a trio do they make. Title track “Belong” harnesses a delectable feeling somewhere between innocence and experience, rich with big guitar backing and those breathy, breathless vocals of Kip Berman. “We tried another,” he sings, “let’s try each other.” The frenzy of “Heaven’s Gonna Happen Now” hearkens back to 80s Brits, owing much to The Smiths in sound but lyrically nowhere near the rainy day moroseness of Moz. My favorite, for now, is “The Heart In Your Heartbreak,” does tread that grey sky territory, all lovely moping backed by sounds so irresistible they belie the sadness contained within. I often think that sad songs are the best to dance to, and “The Heart In Your Heartbreak” is no exception.


Once I got past those three, I realized just how good the record in its entirety actually is. “The Body” cajoles with synthy swirls and Berman’s charming voice. “I wonder what it’s like to be liked,” Berman opines in the John Hughes-would-love-this-song “Even In Dreams,” a song that calls to mind images of Andy and Blaine exchanging lovelorn looks across the halls while that dastardly James Spader keeps a watchful eye on their burgeoning, nearly-doomed romance. “Girl of 1000 Dreams” is as shoegazey as I think I’ve ever heard (well, on record anyway) TPOBPAH get (which is saying a lot), the fuzz nearly overpowering (in a good way) and Kip assertively sassy. Very, very nice. “Too Tough” sounds to me the most like a bridge from the first LP, with its’ steady drums and that certain arch glow to the guitar, sort of like a slightly slow-motion step-brother to the most excellent “Stay Alive.” It’s over far too soon, closing out with the dreamy, synth-heavy lull of “Strange,” a fine note to end on, with Berman singing about dreams coming true and a glorious wall of noise building and building behind him.


There’s something special about this band, my darlings, very special indeed. They’ve struck the perfect balance between sugary pop and kinda sorta badass noise. The latest result of that coupling, Belong, is something you’ll most assuredly find yourself turning to again and again, smiling and laughing and dancing all the while. Without a doubt, one of the best albums you’ll hear all year.


mp3: Belong (The Pains of Being Pure at Heart from Belong)

The Good Ship Rediscovery: Swell Maps - Jane From Occupied Europe

We all forget about the older stuff from time to time, in our quest to stay up to speed with the latest and greatest. But one should always respect their elders. So don’t forget about them, y’hear?

I don’t know about y’all, but sometimes I come across a record, or a band, that makes me ask myself how the heck I managed to miss them for so long. I had this sensation when my former roommate, Chelsea (otherwise known as she whose record collection is even bigger and more amazing than mine), introduced me to Swell Maps and the brilliant record Jane From Occupied Europe. To be fair, that kinda happened a lot when we lived in our Richmondian loft, but Swell Maps left quite an impression on me. There’s so much to love about this record, I don’t even know where to start. But I’ll try.


I suppose I could love it because, well, it’s fucking loud. I haven’t had to try this myself, but if, say, you wanted to piss off your annoying neighbor, Jane From Occupied Europe might do you proud, played with excessive levels of volume. It’s one heck of a snarling, bratty, middle-finger in the face little record. Which, assuredly, is quite a plus. Delving deeper into the reasons I adore this LP, there are the assorted elements within this noisiness. At times, Swell Maps sound more than a little like the Mark E. Smith-led misfits of The Fall. At others, they sound like the deranged cousins of darkly chirpy Glaswegian legends Orange Juice, or the saucy cheek of The Nectarine No. 9. Parts of their contemporaries flare across the album like sunspots, but at the end of the line it's all the genius of Swell Maps. Flat, monotonously bored vocals and surges of knife-sharp guitars marry together under a decidedly lo-fi production, resulting in quite an appealing mess.
This, friends, this is a band that Does. Not. Fuck. Around. This record sounds like they would come, see, conquer, pillage, and drunkenly piss on the embers of your burning village.

Fuck-off indifference with bite courses through the songs on Jane From Occupied Europe, which is yet another plus. Attitude like this is rare, especially when, as it seems with Swell Maps, it’s for real. It’s all required listening, but I’ve got a few special favorites. “Collision With a Frogman” is a treasure, taking Joy Division’s guitars a few steps further in the direction of simplicity and darkness and fisticuffs. It’s three and a half minutes of instrumental chaos, and I fucking love it. “Border Country” is angular, aggressive, and agitated as all get out, though it still retains that air of being totally and utterly bored. And “Blenheim Shots” is a barrage of bigness, big drums, big bass, and big guitar that just keeps searing its way into your skull, in the best way possible of course.


I already love this record to pieces, and yet I still wonder why I don’t listen to it more than I already do. Odds are, it's inspired more than a few bands in your collection. If you’re a fan of all things noisy, strident, and more than a little hostile, Jane From Occupied Europe probably needs to make its way into your record collection.


m4a: Collision With a Frogman (Swell Maps from Jane From Occupied Europe)

Sunday, June 5, 2011

Singles Club: Santah

I've had it on my schedule for weeks, going through my inboxes and getting them down to manageable levels of email. In performing that task today, I had the pleasure of opening an email that has led me to one of my favorite songs of the year.

Santah hails from the Midwesterly lands. Having listened to their sublime "White Noise Bed" several dozen times now, I can't get over how much they sound to me like the Midwestern equivalent of North Carolinians The Love Language. You've got your gorgeous, humid smokiness of the instrumentation, a singer who is at once strong but with a hint of the sad puppy (and
Santah's Stanton McConnell even has the same initials as TLL's Stuart McLamb!), and an overall slow-motion seductiveness that belies the naughty giddiness of secret rendezvous and stolen kisses under starry night skies. It's a fabulous song, perfect for the summer months to come, and I can't wait to hear the rest of the record.

mp3:
White Noise Bed (Santah from White Noise Bed)


Meet Art Imperial

Does proximity to a beach mean a band is more likely to make good "surf"-esque music? Or can a gentleman from the not at all beachy urban landscape of a major metropolis in eastern Canada give those California beachcombers a run for their money? The answer, or both answers, really, are provided by Toronto resident Art Imperial, a one-man surf rock afficianado who jangles and jaunts and twists his away across the surf rock landscape like a pro.

On his (free!) EP, Surf Suburban, Art Imperial brings all the surfness you could possibly want, offering up six summerfresh songs that prove you really don't need to be a bona fide beach bum in order to do that little genre something proper. Wailing and whispering and whipping his way through the songs, Art Imperial creates a great vibe, chilled yet full of infectious energy and good times. Yours truly is a fan, y'all. Don't miss out.

mp3: When I'm With You (I Feel Dumb) (Art Imperial from the Surf Suburban EP)


Friday, June 3, 2011

The Untitled Interview #133 – STPP Fest Edition: Starring Mike Boggs (We Were Pirates)

DC has, for some time now, not really been in love with festivals. Folks have tried, sure, but there is a substantial void in the festival scene when it comes to the “indie” scene. Fuzzy Logic’s brother blog, Sweet Tea Pumpkin Pie, is valiantly trying to give the people what they want: a legit (and FREE!) festival. And with 120+ bands playing over 2 days, there’s a lot to look forward to. Did I mention the freeness? Cuz yeah. It’s one hundred percent FREE. The STPP Fest is June 4-5, with a pre-party June 3. Check the official site for all the pertinent details.

I’ll spare you from the pirate-related puns I could throw into a piece about DC’s exceedingly excellent, dashingly disarming, purveyor of perfectly sugary with a grain of salt indiepop, Mike Boggs, otherwise known as We Were Pirates. What I will say is that WWP knows how to craft super cute songs that make me think of folks like Fountains of Wayne, Nada Surf, and Brendan Benson. And that’s pretty good company to be keeping, y’all. Read on to see how Mike feels about DC festivals, Beck, and the convenience of close proximity.

Fuzzy Logic: Why do you think it’s been so hard to get a festival going here in DC?
Mike Boggs: I think the biggest part of it is just the sheer time and effort it takes to organize something like this. We've had the good fortune of playing Fort Reno and several Rock N' Romp/Crafty bastards shows and being involved with each of them, you see what a time-consuming project any reoccurring music event can be for the organizers. Aside from some volunteer help, people like Amanda Mackaye (Fort Reno) and Debbie Lee (Rock N' Romp) are planning these things just because they care about local music and community and combining the two. Plus, these things aren't instantly successful. Before it ends up on the national radar, a local music festival is the kind of thing that is going to take years to grow. Hopefully this is one of those things that will be around long term.

FL: Band you're most looking forward to seeing at the festival?
MB: The Jet Age. I've actually never seen them play even though Eric from The Jet Age is responsible for Gabe and Kate playing in WWP. Eric saw an add I posted online looking for a bassist and recommended that I ask Kate since The Alphabetical Order was about to break up. Gabe (who played guitar for TAO) intercepted the Myspace message I sent Kate via their band page and agreed to play bass. Kate has never forgiven him, though now that she's in the band on bass and Gabe has been relegated to guitar I think she might be ready to bury the hatchet.

FL: What was the first festival you ever attended, either as a musician or member of the general public?
MB: My first music festival was the HFStival at RFK stadium. I don't remember what year it was. It must have been '96 because I went to see Beck who was touring Odelay. Seeing him play "Devil's Haircut" and "Loser" was almost too much for my pot-addled 14 year old brain to handle. It was epic.

FL: What would you advise the out-of-towners to see/do while they’re in DC?
MB: Obviously the museums first and foremost. Also, by day, the Botanical Gardens or The Arboretum are quite charming. It's not in DC proper, but Gravelly Point is Metro accessible and picnic-friendly. At night I would have recommended a trip Farmers & Fishers, but it's closed due to the floods. If they want to stick around the U street neighborhood, I'd get food at Busboys and Poets or Dukem, then grab a drink at The Gibson.

FL: Favorite thing about festivals?
MB: I think just having so many bands to see is convenient. Going out to shows can be a drag. So getting to see a bunch of different bands all at once sure is convenient.

mp3: Settle Down (We Were Pirates – more here)



The Untitled Interview #132 – STPP Fest Edition: Starring Omer Leibovitz (Courtesy Tier)

DC has, for some time now, not really been in love with festivals. Folks have tried, sure, but there is a substantial void in the festival scene when it comes to the “indie” scene. Fuzzy Logic’s brother blog, Sweet Tea Pumpkin Pie, is valiantly trying to give the people what they want: a legit (and FREE!) festival. And with 120+ bands playing over 2 days, there’s a lot to look forward to. Did I mention the freeness? Cuz yeah. It’s one hundred percent FREE. The STPP Fest is June 4-5, with a pre-party June 3. Check the official site for all the pertinent details.

Two-man bands are a wonderful thing indeed, friends. The best of these dastardly duos can harness incredible power, and Brooklyn’s Courtesy Tier is no exception. Heartfelt, scuzzy, gritty bluesy rock propel out of their hands into the lucky ears of those who happen to be listening. If I was a betting kinda girl, I’d bet these two gents really know how to throw down live and in person. Check ‘em out this weekend and we can all see if I’m right. Oh, but I don’t accept personal checks y’all. Below, Omer Leibovitz gets his festival chatter on.

Fuzzy Logic: Inevitably, you will forget to bring:
Omer Leibovitz: Our set list, our sunglasses and as usual our phone charger.

FL: Band you're most looking forward to seeing at the festival?
OL: The Yes Way, Sami The Great, Great Elk, The Press.

FL: What's the first thing you plan on doing upon arrival in DC?
OL: Jumping out of the van and giving Dave Mann a big juicy hug.

FL: What was the first festival you ever attended, either as a musician or member of the general public?
OL: First festival we ever attended was called The Church of Love and Music when we were 19. We were booked to play with our old band. Opened for Vince Welnick of the Grateful Dead. We were messy!

FL: Favorite thing about festivals?
OL: The community and the awesome amount of music.

mp3: Cold (Courtesy Tier – more here)



The Untitled Interview #131 – STPP Fest Edition: Starring Milkmachine

DC has, for some time now, not really been in love with festivals. Folks have tried, sure, but there is a substantial void in the festival scene when it comes to the “indie” scene. Fuzzy Logic’s brother blog, Sweet Tea Pumpkin Pie, is valiantly trying to give the people what they want: a legit (and FREE!) festival. And with 120+ bands playing over 2 days, there’s a lot to look forward to. Did I mention the freeness? Cuz yeah. It’s one hundred percent FREE. The STPP Fest is June 4-5, with a pre-party June 3. Check the official site for all the pertinent details.

How to go about making the accordian sound badass is quite possibly one of life’s great mysteries. It’s a mystery DC’s own Milkmachine has figured out, as it so happens. Think of them as perhaps a more urbane version of Gogol Bordello and you’ll be on the right track. Milkmachine is at once bawdy, leering, explosive, sophisticated, and downright enjoyable. Read on for the band’s collective musings on the whole festival thing, and what tends to keep DC festivals grounded.

Fuzzy Logic: Why do you think it’s been so hard to get a festival going here in DC?
Milkmachine: The local music scene in DC does not have a unified identity. It's not the sort of thing most venues want to do. They want to get the bands in and out, sell a lot of drinks and be done. This means musicians don't have the opportunity to cross-pollinate or collaborate with each other... this lack of interaction corresponds to the lack of festival momentum.

FL: Band you're most looking forward to seeing at the festival?
M: We're not familiar with most of the bands... but probably Machine Gun Mustache. Just because we like their name.

FL: What was the first festival you ever attended, either as a musician or member of the general public?
M: Russ grew up in the DC area going to the HFStival and has many fond memories of seeing Primus, Cracker, Meat Puppets, Archers of Loaf, etc.

FL: What would you advise the out-of-towners to see/do while they’re in DC?
M: Gravely point when the wind is blowing northerly.

FL: Favorite thing about festivals?
M: Exposure to so many new and local sounds. Can't wait!

mp3: With The Lights On (Milkmachine from Bees On The Vine)



The Untitled Interview #130 – STPP Fest Edition: Starring Eileen Graham (Noble Air)

DC has, for some time now, not really been in love with festivals. Folks have tried, sure, but there is a substantial void in the festival scene when it comes to the “indie” scene. Fuzzy Logic’s brother blog, Sweet Tea Pumpkin Pie, is valiantly trying to give the people what they want: a legit (and FREE!) festival. And with 120+ bands playing over 2 days, there’s a lot to look forward to. Did I mention the freeness? Cuz yeah. It’s one hundred percent FREE. The STPP Fest is June 4-5, with a pre-party June 3. Check the official site for all the pertinent details.

There’s something ethereal about certain parts of Virginia (and if you’re wondering, that magical quality doesn’t quite make it to NoVA). The Shenandoah Valley area is a wondrous, beautiful and haunted place, so it’s no wonder those superlatives can so often be given to bands (and, for that matter, people) hailing from those parts. Noble Air has the Valley within, and Eileen Graham has quite a bewitching voice. She’s also craving Georgetown Cupcakes, and who can fault that? Below, Eileen talks festivals, cupcakes, and the need for extra extension cords.

Fuzzy Logic: Inevitably, you will forget to bring:
Eileen Graham: An extension cord. My super short keyboard cord constantly foils me.

FL: Band you're most looking forward to seeing at the festival?
EG: The Yes Way at Bella Cafe. They've really got their own sound, which is less and less common.

FL: What's the first thing you plan on doing upon arrival in DC?
EG: Snagging some Georgetown cupcakes-- really. I've been thinking on them for about a month now.

FL: What was the first festival you ever attended, either as a musician or member of the general public?
EG: MACRoCk, put on in my college town of Harrisonburg, Va. Lots of intimate venues and many of the bands that you see there become the next big thing.

FL: Favorite thing about festivals?
EG: Freedom! If you aren't feeling a show, hop on to the next without feeling like you wasted your money.

mp3: I Cry You Cry (Noble Air – more here)


The Untitled Interview #129 – STPP Fest Edition: Starring Derek Sheehan (The Tweeds)

DC has, for some time now, not really been in love with festivals. Folks have tried, sure, but there is a substantial void in the festival scene when it comes to the “indie” scene. Fuzzy Logic’s brother blog, Sweet Tea Pumpkin Pie, is valiantly trying to give the people what they want: a legit (and FREE!) festival. And with 120+ bands playing over 2 days, there’s a lot to look forward to. Did I mention the freeness? Cuz yeah. It’s one hundred percent FREE. The STPP Fest is June 4-5, with a pre-party June 3. Check the official site for all the pertinent details.

I like tweed. I also happen to like The Tweeds. Whether or not they wear tweed whilst playing I can’t say, but good heavens that would be great. Sonically, these Philadelphians tread fairly nostalgic waters, indulging in shades of early 90s college rock, shoegaze of that same era, and a little of the 60s Brit shimmy thrown in for good measure. It’s a rather sassy little combination, I must say. Multitasking Tweed Derek Sheehan had the following to say about his festival experiences, and the band he’s most excited to see.

Fuzzy Logic: Inevitably, you will forget to bring:
Derek Sheehan: Probably something minor but essential like guitar straps or the set list...

FL: Band you're most looking forward to seeing at the festival?
DS: Screen Vinyl Image. We played with them in philly before and they put on a fantastic show.

FL: What's the first thing you plan on doing upon arrival in DC?
DS: Grabbing a beer!

FL: What was the first festival you ever attended, either as a musician or member of the general public?
DS: The first festival as a fan was All Points West in NYC. Radiohead headlined and it was amazing! First as a musician was the Utica Music Festival with the The Tweeds.

FL: Favorite thing about festivals?
DS: Just the vibe. A bunch of food, drink and music always makes for a great time!

mp3: Christmas Time (The Tweeds – more here)